Past Expeditions

ArcticNet, Greenedge, netcare, the w. garfield foundation, esrf 2016

On 3 June 2016 the CCGS Amundsen left Quebec City for a 125-day journey to the Canadian Arctic in support of ArcticNet's marine-based research program, the GreenEdge-ArcticNet program, the NETCARE (Network on Climate and Aerosols) program, the integrated Beaufort Observatory (iBO-ESRF) project and a collaboration between ArcticNet, The W. Garfield Weston Foundation and Parks Canada.

  • Leg 1a – GreenEdge/ArcticNet (3 - 23 June) Quebec City to Qikiqtarjuaq
  • Leg 1b – GreenEdge/ArcticNet (23 June - 14 July) Qikiqtarjuaq to Iqaluit
  • Leg 2a – ArcticNet/NETCARE (14 - 27 July) Iqaluit to Qikiqtarjuaq
  • Leg 2b – ArcticNet/NETCARE/The W. Garfield Weston Foundation (27 July - 25 August) Qikiqtarjuaq to Kugluktuk
  • Leg 3a – ArcticNet/ESRF (25 August - 17 September) Kugluktuk to Kugluktuk
  • Leg 3b – ArcticNet/The W. Garfield Weston Foundation (17 September - 6 October) Kugluktuk to Quebec City

ArcticNet, Geotraces, Statoil, IOL 2015

The Amundsen left its home port of Quebec City on 17 April for an initial 18-day expedition to collect MetOcean, sea ice, iceberg and environmental data in the Labrador Sea as part of a collaboration between ArcticNet, Statoil Canada, the Research & Development Corporation of Newfoundland and Labrador and Husky Energy. The ship returned to Quebec City after Leg 1 and departed again on 10 July for a 115-day expedition in support of ArcticNet and its industry partners, the ArcticNet-ESRF program, and Geotraces. The ship arrived back in Quebec City on 1 November. Based on the scientific objectives, the 2015 expedition was divided into seven segments:

  • Leg 1 – ArcticNet/Industry (17 April – 4 May)
  • Leg 2 – Geotraces/ArcticNet (10 July – 20 August)
  • Leg 3a – ArcticNet/ESRF/IOL/Geotraces (20 August – 4 September)
  • Leg 3b – Geotraces/ArcticNet/IOL (4 September – 1 October)
  • Leg 4a – ArcticNet (1 – 11 October)
  • Leg 4b – ArcticNet (11 – 26 October)
  • Leg 4c – ArcticNet (26 October – 1 November)

ArcticNet, NETCARE, JAMSTEC/NIPR 2014

On 8 July 2014 the CCGS Amundsen left Quebec City for a 96-day journey to the Canadian Arctic in support of ArcticNet's marine-based research program, the ArcticNet-BREA program, NETCARE (Network on Climate and Aerosols) and a collaboration with researchers from the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) and the National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR).

  • Leg 1a – ArcticNet/NETCARE (8 – 24 July) Quebec City to Resolute
  • Leg 1b – ArcticNet (24 July – 14 August) Resolute to Kugluktuk
  • Leg 2a – ArcticNet/BREA (14 August – 9 September) Kugluktuk to Barrow, Alaska
  • Leg 2b – ArcticNet/Japan (9 – 25 September) Barrow, Alaska to Kugluktuk
  • Leg 3 – ArcticNet (25 September – 11 October) Kugluktuk to Quebec City

ArcticNet 2013

On 26 July 2013 the CCGS Amundsen left its home port of Quebec City for a 73-day journey to the Canadian Arctic in support of ArcticNet's marine-based research program.

  • Leg 1 - ArcticNet (26 July - 5 September) Quebec City to Resolute
  • Leg 2 - ArcticNet (5 September - 6 October) Resolute to Kugluktuk to Quebec City

ArcticNet, IORVL, BP 2011

On 19 July 2011 the CCGS Amundsen left its home port of Quebec City for a 4 month expedition to the Canadian Arctic in support of ArcticNet's marine-based research program and the ArcticNet-Industry collaborative program.

  • Leg 1 - ArcticNet (18 July - 11 August)
  • Leg 2a - ArcticNet/IORVL (11 August - 26 August)
  • Leg 2b - ArcticNet/IORVL (26 August - 7 September)
  • Leg 2c - ArcticNet/BP (7 September - 24 September)
  • Leg 3a - ArcticNet (24 September - 4 October)
  • Leg 3b - ArcticNet (4 October - 30 October)

ArcticNet, BP 2010

On 1 July 2010 the CCGS Amundsen left its home port of Quebec City for a 4 month expedition to the Canadian Arctic in support of ArcticNet’s marine-based research program and the ArcticNet-Industry collaborative program.

  • Leg 1a - ArcticNet (1 July - 2 August)
  • Leg 1b - ArcticNet (2 August - 12 August)
  • Leg 2a - ArcticNet/BP (12 August - 26 August)
  • Leg 2b - ArcticNet/BP (26 August - 23 September)
  • Leg 3a - ArcticNet/BP (23 September - 7 October)
  • Leg 3b - ArcticNet (7 October - 22 October)
  • Leg 3c - ArcticNet (22 October - 31 October)

ArcticNet, IORVL, Malina, GEOTRACES 2009

On 4 June 2009 the CCGS Amundsen left its home port of Quebec City for a 5 month expedition to the Canadian Arctic on 4 June 2009 to support several research programs: 1) ArcticNet and the ArcticNet-Industry collaborative program 2) the French Malina program and 3) the Canadian IPY GEOTRACES program.

  • Leg 1a - ArcticNet/IORVL (4 June - 30 June)
  • Leg 1b - ArcticNet/IORVL (30 June - 16 July)
  • Leg 2a - ArcticNet/IORVL (16 July - 30 July)
  • Leg 2b - Malina/ArcticNet (30 July - 27 August)
  • Leg 3a - GEOTRACES/ArcticNet/IORVL (27 August - 12 September)
  • Leg 3b - ArcticNet/IORVL (12 September - 8 October)
  • Leg 4a - ArcticNet/IORVL (8 October - 6 November)
  • Leg 4b - ArcticNet (6 November - 18 November)

ArcticNet, CFL, Qanuippitali Health Survey, SOLAS 2007-2008

In July of 2007, the CCGS Amundsen left its home port of Quebec City for an historical 15 month expedition to the Canadian Arctic to support ArcticNet and several projects funded by the Canadian International Polar Year (IPY) program. Among these projects were the Circumpolar Flaw Lead (CFL) study, a large Canadian-led international effort to understand the role of the CFL in a context of Arctic warming and the Qanuippitali Inuit Health Survey where doctors, nurses, interpreters and scientists used the CCGS Amundsen to visit the coastal communities of Nunavut, the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (NT) and Nunatsiavut (Labrador) to assess the overall health of Inuit residents. The CFL and the Inuit Health Surveys were carried out in close collaboration with ArcticNet.

  • Leg 1 - ArcticNet (26 July - 17 August 2007)
  • Leg 2 - Health Survey (17 August - 27 September 2007)
  • Leg 3a - ArcticNet/SOLAS (27 September - 18 October 2007)
  • Leg 3b - ArcticNet/SOLAS/CFL (18 October - 8 November 2007)
  • Leg 4 to Leg 10a - CFL (10 November 2007 - 5 August 2008)
  • Leg 10b - Health Survey (5 August - 3 September 2008)
  • Leg 11a - ArcticNet (4 - 28 September 2008)
  • Leg 11b - ArcticNet (28 September - 5 October 2008)
  • Leg 12 - Health Survey (5 - 16 October 2008)

ArcticNet 2006

On 22 August 2006 the CCGS Amundsen left Quebec City for an 80-day expedition in support of ArcticNet's research activities. In addition to extensive oceanographic and biological sampling, the CSL Heron hydrographic launch was deployed to augment the Amundsen's seabed and benthic mapping capacity in support of a collaborative project between ArcticNet and Parks Canada in the eastern Arctic.

ArcticNet 2005

The CCGS Amundsen left Quebec City on 5 August 2005 for an 84-day expedition to the Canadian Arctic in support of ArcticNet's marine-based research program. Over 200 stations were sampled for oceanographic, atmospheric, biological and seabed properties from Baffin Bay, through Hudson Bay and the Northwest Passage to the Beaufort Sea.

ArcticNet, Qanuippitaa? Health Survey 2004

From 28 August to 4 October 2004, the CCGS Amundsen was transformed into a floating research clinic to carry out the Qanuippitaa? (How are we?) Inuit Health Survey. A multidisciplinary team of doctors, nurses and scientists used the ship to visit the 14 coastal communities of Nunavik (Northern Quebec) in order to assess the overall health of over 1000 Nunavik residents by evaluating their lifestyle, diet, incidence of heart disease, bone density, safety habits and exposure to environmental contaminants. Cutting edge medical equipment, not readily available in the North, was installed on board the vessel to allow for mammography, carotid thickness and bone densitometry testing. Through such surveys, better preventive and curative actions can be taken to increase the quality of health care and disease prevention in the North. During the survey, researchers also conducted complementary studies on health (ex. drinking water quality, emerging infectious diseases, chronic diseases) and on physical properties of the Nunavik coastal environment.

The survey was co-funded by the Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec (MSSS), the Regional Board of Health and Social Services of Nunavik, ArcticNet, the Northern Contaminants Program and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Canadian Arctic Shelf Exchange Study 2003-2004

Funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), the Canadian Arctic Shelf Exchange Study (CASES) Research Network was an international Canadian-led effort under Canadian leadership to understand the biogeochemical and ecological consequences of sea ice variability and change on the Mackenzie Shelf in the eastern Beaufort Sea. The scientific program of CASES was underpinned by the simple central hypothesis that the atmospheric, oceanic, and hydrologic forcing of sea ice variability dictates the nature and magnitude of biogeochemical carbon fluxes on and at the edge of the Mackenzie Shelf.

The main thrust of the CASES field program was the one-year expedition of the CCGS Amundsen to the Mackenzie Shelf. Over 200 scientists belonging to teams from Canada, Denmark, Japan, Norway, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States took rotations on the CCGS Amundsen to study all aspects of the ecosystem from September 2003 to September 2004. This Arctic mission of unprecedented scope comprised three major parts: (1) a fall survey covering the entire study area from September to December 2003, including the recovery of the 8 moorings deployed from the CCGS Sir Wilfrid Laurier in 2002 and the deployment of 17 new mooring arrays; (2) the over-wintering of the ship in Franklin Bay for the monitoring of the winter evolution of the ecosystem; and (3) the spring/summer spatial survey of the region to monitor the break-up of the stamukhi, the opening of the Cape Bathurst polynya and the development of the summer ecosystem, including the recovery in August/September 2004 of the oceanographic moorings, of which 7 were redeployed.

The highly successful CASES program has initiated on-going time-series of key measurements of the response of the marine ecosystem to change that have been expanded to other Arctic regions through the ArcticNet project and the International Polar Year.

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